Life News reports:

MSNBC’s Ali Velshi took his Saturday show on the road to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to cover that state’s new pro-life law in the new post-Roe era. As part of the show, Velshi moderated an absurd panel of abortion providers and activists where the pro-lifers were summarized as a bunch miscarriage criminalizing, flat Earth, racist, transphobic, ableist birth control banners.

On the subject of miscarriages, Velshi wondered “you’re worried that women who might be having miscarriage are worried that they are going to fall into this legal system somehow. How does that play out?”

If Velshi was fear mongering, co-director of the cumbersomely named People Organizing For Women’s Empowerment and Rights flat out lied, “I fully see the Alabama legislature and other state legislatures going towards the criminalization of miscarriage in general. Because if you can’t prove that you didn’t take mifepristone or misoprostol, the abortion drugs, then how, I mean, there’s no way for them to prove your innocence because there’s no test that can tell anyone if you took it or not, so every miscarriage is going to be investigated.”

Later in the segment, director of patient care and programs at West Alabama Women’s Center, Dr. Leah Torres lamented, “Every time that I hear “abortion ban,” I hear a ban on your bodily sovereignty.”

Illinois Right to Life wrote in 2020:

Dr. Leah Torres, notorious and Twitter-famous abortionist, has just had her medical license suspended in Alabama after years of performing abortions.

Due to suspected fraudulency in her application, Torres was ordered by the Alabama Board of Medical Examiners to “immediately CEASE AND DESIST” from practicing medicine in Alabama.

Torres made headlines in 2018 when, in an effort to justify performing late-term abortions, she tweeted: “You know fetuses can’t scream, right? I transect the cord 1st so there’s really no opportunity, if they’re even far enough along to have a larynx.” In another tweet she stated, “God performs way more abortions than I do, so there’s that.” These and other provocative statements made by Torres may have been, in part, the reason for her suspension.

According to the statement issued by the Alabama Board for Medical Examiners, Torres “committed unprofessional conduct as defined in the rules promulgated by the Medical Licensure Commission.” More specifically, the Board censures her for making “public statements related to the practice of medicine which violate the high standards of honesty, diligence, prudence, and ethical integrity demanded from physicians licensed to practice in Alabama.”

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